WHERE IS THIS MACHINE YOU SPEAK OF?

(Photo courtesy of The Daily Beast)


By 
Maze Jackson


If the 2019 Mayoral Election proves one thing, it is that the mythological Cook County Democratic Machine is either non-existent or a mere shadow of its former self.  One only need to look at the 2019 Chicago Mayoral Election for proof.   In what “Machine” scenario under say a Mayor Richard J. Daley, would the CHAIRMAN OF THE COOK COUNTY DEMOCRATIC PARTY lose ALL 50 WARDS and only win 20 precincts out of 2069!?!?!?  Under what “Machine” scenario would a Democratic Committeeman be able to have any respect if they could not persuade their voters to vote the “right” way?  Under what “Machine” scenario would Democratic Committeemen be able to endorse any candidate other than the Chairman of the Party for the highest seat in the land?

(Election map courtesy of Chicago Tribune)


You see, this race wasn’t for the local school council (although those races are very important), this was for the crown jewel, the highest seat in the land, the most coveted position in Chicago politics…MAYOR OF CHICAGO, GREATEST CITY IN THE WORLD!  And yet, there was Madame President Toni Preckwinkle, Chairman of the Cook County Democratic Party, in that exact scenario.  She was out of money, off of TV, and on political life support against a relative unknown, a former employee, who had come back for a hostile takeover of the City she had once worked for.  And instead of having the so-called “Machine” to rely on, she was left to work with a few political warlords, celebrity rappers, black businessmen, complete with an inexperienced staff who had never been battle tested. 

The Lightfoot political operation was in the smartphone world.


Meanwhile, Toni’s former White progressive allies were rushing to the assist the insurgent Lightfoot, showering her with cash, resources, and the “Machine” remnants and gears hoping to rebuild a new type of machine, a smartphone type of machine.  Think of it like the progression from typewriters to technology, from analog to digital, from snail mail to email, with all the iterations in between.  Lori’s team was thinking and planning in the smartphone era, while Toni Preckwinkle’s team thought they were innovating with Harold Washington Campaign 2.0.  Team Preckwinkle was insistent on selling the Black community a word processor even though all of us had smartphones in our pockets.  In the smartphone era, credit and debit card run the “Machine” and Toni had neither with  Black People.

The current Black political machine in Chicago is like the word processor…out of date!


But back to the so-called “Machine” Black People have been programmed to fear.  That so-called “machine” that is the convenient vehicle for White People to use Black People to get what they politically want when it’s convenient.  Be “loyal” Democrats when we want to raise and spend millions to take out a “disloyal” Ken Dunkin, but won’t raise $500K to help the Cook County Democratic Party Chairman win the mayor’s race.  Be “loyal” Democrats when it’s time to slate the type of judges that get Jason Van Dyke home in 3 years, but stand by idly and watch as local police chiefs that they govern attack Kim Foxx.  The so-called “machine” demands loyalty when it’s time for fear, respect, money, jobs, and contracts to be given to White Men with the most money and lowest voter turnouts.  That’s the “Machine” that Black People have.


In the meantime, not one of the White so-called Machine bosses carried their wards for Toni Preckwinkle. As a matter of fact, none of them carried ONE PRECINCT for her and she is THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COOK COUNTY DEMOCRATIC PARTY!  That’s not “Machine” or “Boss!” That’s just straight bull, but that’s what you get using a word processor in the smartphone era like Black People seem to keep doing.

(Black Terminator courtesy of Teves Design Studio)
https://www.milesteves.com/gallery/v/various+films/Black-Terminator.jpg.html

It’s time for Black People to leave the word processors behind and build our own new machine, and I’m not talking about a smartphone either.  I’m talking about building the Black Political Terminator, an artificial intelligence driven robot that destroys anything that gets in the way of building Black political power.  It’s time to junk our political word processors and prepare for a new day in Black politics! It’s time we get our own voter database and contact system, it’s time we train and create our own precinct captain, build our own bench, and elect Black politicians that are Black FIRST! It’s time to go from victims to victors!

#mazesaid

#WIIFTBP


(Now I recognize that some of you may not get the similes, metaphors, and analogies contained herein, which actually proves my point.)

The “What’s in it for the Black People?” Voter’s Guide

 

The “What’s in it for the Black People?” Voter’s Guide, is just that, a guide of candidates based on their history, actions, and plans as they relate specifically to the interests of Black people.  We decided to provide this list after receiving a recommended candidates list in the mail from a major political Party who shall remain nameless.  After research and review, we found numerous candidates who had a record of being hostile to the Black community, regardless of Party affiliation.  So we decided to create the “What’s In It for the Black People?” Voter’s Guide.

This list is not meant to be partisan and is unapologetic in its purpose, “to elect candidates in the best self interests of Black People.”  We will also provide insights and explanations for our choices in the most controversial and contested races.  It is our hope that providing this list will allow the Black community to begin electing candidates that best represent our interests, not because of the letter behind their name, but by the actions they have demonstrated.

THE “WHAT’S IN IT FOR THE BLACK PEOPLE?” VOTER’S GUIDE

SAFE ROADS AMENDMENT (For the proposed addition of Section 11 to Article IX of the Illinois Constitution)

Yes 

PRESIDENT/VICE PRESIDENT

2-Hillary Rodham Clinton & Timothy Michael Kaine

UNITED STATES SENATOR

You Pick- While not a fan of current US Senator Mark Kirk, Congresswoman Tammy Duckworth continues to ignore the Black community.

ILLINOIS COMPTROLLER (Unexpired 2-year term)

15- Leslie Geissler Munger- Although Munger is a Republican she has consistently courted the Black community’s support, even hiring Blacks to highest levels in her administration.  Her competitor, Susana Mendoza, has consistently proven herself hostile to the Black community, whether voting to expand the death penalty, supporting the LaQuan McDonald cover up, or voting to expand red light cameras, Mendoza will continue the politics that have driven this state to be the worst for Black in the nation.

U.S. REPRESENTATIVES

Bobby Rush

Danny Davis

Robin Kelly 

STATE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE SENATE

Uncontested For future reference uncontested races mean they never have to answer “What’s in it for the Black People?”

METROPOLITAN WATER RECLAMATION DISTRICT 6-YEAR TERM (CHOOSE 3)

51- Barbara McGowan

52- Mariyana T. Spyropoulos

*53- Josina Morita (Most likely to be the Cook County’s first Asian-American elected official, this candidate has a history of working in the Black community and earned our respect when she publicly addressed a colleague’s hypocrisy on criminal justice reform. She’s one to watch.)

METROPOLITAN WATER RECLAMATION DISTRICT COMMISSIONER 2-YEAR TERM

58- Marty Durkan

STATE’S ATTORNEY

62- Kim Foxx You already know the deal…Don’t front! GO KIM!

CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT

64- Dorothy Brown

RECORDER OF DEEDS

65- Karen A. Yarborough

 

group-photo-1160x678

JUDGE OF APPELLATE COURTS- EPSTEIN VACANCY

71- Eileen O’Neill Burke

JUDGE OF APPELLATE COURTS- QUINN VACANCY

NO Bertina E. Lampkin DO NOT RETAIN (Loyal Burge era prosecutor)

JUDGE OF CIRCUIT COURT- BIEBEL, JR. VACANCY

*73- John Fitgerald Lyke Make sure you vote for John.  He’s got a bright future, let’s get him big numbers!

JUDGE OF CIRCUIT COURT-ELROD VACANCY

74- Rossana Patricia Fernandez

JUDGE OF CIRCUIT COURT- HOGAN VACANCY

75- Alison C. Conlon

JUDGE OF CIRCUIT COURT- HOWLETT, JR. VACANCY

76- Aleksandra “Alex”Gillespie

JUDGE OF CIRCUIT COURT- JOHNSON VACANCY

77- Carolyn J. Gallagher

JUDGE OF CIRCUIT COURT- KARNEZIS VACANCY

78- Mary Kathleen McHugh

JUDGE OF CIRCUIT COURT- LOVE VACANCY

79- Brendan O’Brien

JUDGE OF CIRCUIT COURT- O’BRIEN VACANCY

80- Mary O’Donoghue Hannon

JUDGE OF CIRCUIT COURT- PALMER VACANCY

81- Susan L. Ortiz

JUDGE OF CIRCUIT COURT- RUSCITTI GRUSSEL VACANCY

82- Daniel Patrick Duffy

JUDGE OF CIRCUIT COURT- WALSH VACANCY

83- Patrick Joseph Powers

JUDGE 1st SUBCIRCUIT- BRIM VACANCY

Jesse Outlaw

JUDGE 1st SUBCIRCUIT- HOPKINS VACANCY

Rhonda Crawford

JUDGE 2nd SUBCIRCUIT- SAVAGE VACANCY

D. Renee Jackson

JUDGE 4th SUBCIRCUIT- KUNKLE VACANCY

Edward J. King

JUDGE 5TH SUBCIRCUIT- EADIE-DANIELS VACANCY

92- Leonard Murray

JUDGE 5TH SUBCIRCUIT- STUART VACANCY

*94- Freddrenna M. Lyle

JUDGE 5TH SUBCIRCUIT- WILLIAMS VACANCY

96- Darryl Jones

JUDGE 6th SUBCIRCUIT- PONCE DE LEON VACANCY

Eulalia “Evie” De La Rosa

JUDGE 6th SUBCIRCUIT-SANTIAGO VACANCY

Richard C. Cooke

JUDGE 6th SUBCIRCUIT

Anna Loftus

JUDGE 7th SUBCIRCUIT-BURRELL VACANCY

Marianne Jackson

JUDGE 7th SUBCIRCUIT- RIVKIN-CAROTHERS VACANCY

Patricia “Pat” Spratt

JUDGE 9th SUBCIRCUIT-BERMAN VACANCY

Jerry Esrig

JUDGE 10th SUBCIRCUIT- HOWARD VACANCY

Eve Marie Reilly

JUDGE 11th SUBCIRCUIT- KELLY VACANCY

Catherine Ann Schneider

JUDGE 11th SUBCIRCUIT-ZWICK VACANCY

William B. Sullivan

JUDGE 12th SUBCIRCUIT- KAZMIERSKI VACANCY

Marguerite Anne Quinn

JUDGE 12th SUBCIRCUIT-  MATHEIN VACANCY

James Leonard Allegretti

JUDGE 12th SUBCIRCUIT-TRISTANO VACANCY

Carrie Hamilton

JUDGE 12th SUBCIRCUIT- ADDITIONAL JUDGESHIP

James Edward Hanlon

JUDGE 12th SUBCIRCUIT- FECAROTTA VACANCY

Ketki “Kay” Steffen

JUDGE 14th SUBCIRCUIT- MURPHY VACANCY

Matthew Link

 

BALLOT FOR JUDICIAL CANDIDATES SEEKING RETENTION IN OFFICE

*VOTE NO– By voting no, it allows you to select the judges individually and stop the bad judges from getting back in office.  Included in this batch of judges are former John Burge accomplices, LaQuan McDonald decision makers, and judges that have upheld the wrongful convictions of people who were eventually proven innocent.  It is here where we can make the most political impact on our daily lives. REMEMBER: If you vote “yes” all of the judges will be re-elected without having to answer for the decisions they made against the Black community.

 

SHALL EACH PERSON LISTED BE RETAINED IN OFFICE AS JUDGE OF THE APPELLATE COURT, FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT?

201- YES- Joy Virginia Cunningham

SHALL EACH OF THE PERSONS LISTED BR RETAINED IN OFFICE AS A JUDGE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, COOK COUNTY?

VOTE NO FOR THESE JUDGES (DO NOT SKIP, YOU MUST VOTE NO)

258- Jeanne Cleveland Bernstein (Cook County Bar Association recommendation)

234- Charles Patrick Burns (Burge prosecutor)

304- Ann Finley Collins (blocked the appointment of Black judges)

232- Nicholas Ford (Burge prosecutor)

210- Vincent Gaughan (Issued gag order in LaQuan McDonald case)

262- Kay M. Hanlon (previously ran as Republican, switched to Democrat to get elected in Cook County)

222 -Bertina Lampkin (known as “Hang ‘Em High amongst Black judges, Lampkin was a Burge prosecutor, defended wrongful convictions, particularly hard on Black defendants)

240- Diane J. Larsen (Madigan ally, blocked redistricting reforms)

242- Daniel Joseph Lynch (sentenced Black man to 6 years in jail for contempt of court, removed by Illinois Supreme Court)

270- Patrick T. Murphy (publicly opposed Chief Judge Evans in attempted power grab)

282- Daniel James Pierce (led public charge against Chief Judge Tim Evans)

206- Irwin J. Solganick (Cook County Bar Association recommendation)

VOTE YES FOR THESE JUDGES

 

255- Robert Balanoff

299- Steven James Bernstein
211- Robert W. Bertucci
259- Kathleen Marie Burke
297- John P. Callahan
301- Bonita Coleman
251- Paula M. Daleo
213- Deborah Mary Dooling
253- Laurence J. Dunford

*215- Timothy C. Evans

305- Daniel J. Gallagher

235- Denise Kathleen Filan
279- John C. Griffin
203- Sophia H. Hall
291- Edward S. Harmening
285- William H. Hooks
229- Arnette Hubbard
217- Cheryl D. Ingram
219- Raymond L. Jagielski
307- Sharon O. Johnson
309- Linzey D. Jones
263- Thomas J. Kelley
*237- John P. Kirby
295- Geary W. Kull
287- Thomas V. Lyons, II
311- Terence MacCarthy
223- William O. Maki
293- Daniel B. Malone
249- Leroy K. Martin, Jr.
227- James Patrick McCarthy
265- Clare Elizabeth McWilliams
267- Mary Mikva
289- Raymond W. Mitchell
283- Allen F. Murphy
271- Timothy P. Murphy
243- Kathleen M. Pantle

313- Sandra G. Ramos
273- Jim Ryan
245- Kevin M. Sheehan
225- Sharon M. Sullivan
315- Susan Kennedy Sullivan
247- John D. Turner
275- Edward Washington, II
207- Alexander P. White
277- Thaddeus L. Wilson

ELIMINATE THE COOK COUNTY RECORDER OF DEEDS?

No

EARNED SICK TIME EMPLOYEE ACT

No. (This is a non-binding referendum designed to make Black people turn out to vote, with no intentions of passing the bill.  We should only consider this if it is a BINDING referendum).

INCREASED PENALTIES FOR GUN CRIMES

No. (This is a non-binding referendum designed to take advantage of crime in the Black community.  Chicago has the toughest gun laws in the country.  More jail is not the answer, more jobs and resources are.)

SHOULD CHICAGO WORK WITH FEDERAL GOVERNMENT ON INFRASTRUCTURE

Yes. (Again this is a non-binding referendum.  All three of these questions were placed on the ballot to prevent term limits for the Mayor from being voted on by the people.)

It is legal to take this list with you to your polling place.  This guide is not meant to tell you who to vote for as much as to provide some insight from an unapologetically Black perspective on who Black people should consider voting for.  Our recommendations take into consideration a variety of factors based on particular insights we may have   Remember, this is the “What’s in it for the Black People?” Recommended Candidates Guide.  If THEY are complaining about the list, or the candidates we picked, just ask their candidate, “What’s in it for the Black People?”  If they get offended or don’t have an answer…you have you answer.

Early voting has already begun.  Election Day is Tuesday, November 8th!

Right to Work Zones and Unions in the Black Community

by

Maze Jackson

 

Governor Bruce Rauner has proposed introducing employee empowerment zones in Illinois and it has not been received with open arms by unions or legislators around the state. While the Governor initially proposed changing Illinois, known as a union stronghold, into a right to work state, he has settled on empowerment zones.

Governor Rauner says, “Employee empowerment zones will allow Illinois to better compete with employment-flexible states, like Indiana. The Turnaround Agenda empowers local voters and communities to decide if they should be open or closed shop, and these zones will help attract businesses, which will create jobs, particularly in areas with high unemployment.”

It would also exploit historic tensions between the trade unions and the Black community, which has long-held that the unions are barriers to Black employment in Black communities.

Trade unions, formed after slavery were initially created for workers rights, but also to prevent skilled slaves from taking jobs from White workers.   Over time, as Blacks migrated North and White businessmen sought to break strikes, they often employed Black “scabs” who were willing to accept the verbal and often physical abuse of White union members and expendable to the White business owners.

Concurrently, Black leaders like A. Phillip Randolph eventually began organizing groups like the Pullman Porters who advocated specifically for Black workers. Eventually, Black unions were integrated into larger White unions with their presence being relegated to Black “caucuses.”

The trade unions, which traditionally have the highest paid remain primarily dominated by White ethnic men in membership and leadership, and receive complaints from legislators and community activists alike for their lack of diversity. Conversely, low wage Black and minority workers dominate the service unions, with “liberal” White leadership making most policy decisions. Both groups say that right to work laws are bad for working middle class families, pointing to a Public Policy Polling report that states, “55% of voters are resistant to right to work laws.”

But with a Black unemployment rate of almost 25% in Chicago, and projected to be almost 14% statewide, the question becomes what is the benefit of employee empowerment zones for Black community? Black community activists and Black legislators alike agree that while unions provide great jobs and wages, they are the barrier to Blacks accessing those great jobs and wages. “Right to work zones are needed to allow the people who have been left out to participate in rebuilding their own communities. Then, once the community is rebuilt they want us to leave,” stated community activist and organizer of Voice Of The Ex-offender (VOTE).

The unions counter with the fact that while there are opportunities for growth, Black people are not applying to become part of the trade unions. In response, they have increased their outreach efforts. “One of the biggest challenges we find it that most people do not know the process of how to find the job. Once a person gets in the program, they can be as successful as they want to be, “ said IBEW Local 134 official Mario Miller.

State Representative Ken Dunkin, counters, “We have to hold these unions accountable. They’ve got to explain to our community why they should not have the right to work. “

Right to work zones will most likely be voted on this week, will fail miserably, and the unions will be able to claim a big victory against the Governor. What remains to be seen is how this vote plays out in the upcoming Statehouse elections. If the Black unemployment rates remain disproportionately high and social services continue to get cut, many of the same Black legislators who will vote against the right to work zone legislation will have to explain to their constituencies why they voted for unions and against their right to work.   That will be difficult to sell to unemployed Blacks.

Black Caucus-Governor Rauner…”Together?”

(from The Weekly Intelligence Report)

11270633_721301557992633_644469867015040369_o
Members of the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus.

As the state budget impasse continues with little to no progress, the state budget battle is shaping up to be a battle of egos between two of Springfield’s “five tops,” holding the rest of Illinois hostage until someone blinks. I sat down with the Chairman of the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus, State Senator Kimberly A. Lightford on The Maze Said Radio Show and Podcast, and I got the distinct impression that some members of the Black Caucus were willing to negotiate with Rauner, depending on the terms.

Illinois Legislative Black Caucus Chairman Kimberly A. Lightford
Illinois Legislative Black Caucus Chairman Kimberly A. Lightford

On the flip side, sources inside the Rauner camp tells me Rauner wants the support of the Black Caucus so bad, he would be willing to fund Black Caucus priorities AND grow Black business opportunities with in each of the districts. Of course, that would mean supporting Rauner’s “Turnaround Agenda.” Black Caucus members remain skeptical, preferring Rauner to bring business to the state before they consider cutting a deal, but they did not rule out the possibility of a deal, which is intriguing.

Gov. Rauner and Rev. James Meeks, who Lightford implied sided with Rauner after being frustrated with Democrats treatment of Blacks.
Gov. Rauner and Rev. James Meeks, who Lightford implied sided with Rauner after being frustrated with Democrats treatment of Blacks.

A Black Caucus/Rauner alliance would not solve the budget crisis, but it would change the balance of power in Springfield, giving the Black Caucus a bigger voice in directing where the state’s funding goes.   The Senate President John Cullerton has already shown some willingness to work with the Governor, but as Lightford acknowledged, has not been as “involved” in the battle as the Governor and Speaker Madigan. She also acknowledged that it would be more difficult to gather the same support in the House.

Sources inside the Caucus inform me that Rauner has been quietly meeting with Black Caucus members in the House. Democratic leaders were so nervous about Black Caucus House members meeting with Rauner, they requested written confirmation of the meetings. Members balked at the suggestion, but clearly there are concerns that the Black Caucus will begin to leverage the power of their numbers.

Gov. Rauner talks with Sen. Napoleon Harris at State Budget Address. (photo courtesy of Reboot Illinois)
Gov. Rauner talks with Sen. Napoleon Harris at State Budget Address. (photo courtesy of Reboot Illinois)

But “we are looking at it,” Lightford answered when I inquired why not cut the best deal for the Black people. “The Governor has a list,” she continued, “but we need to look at that list together” and pick which things “we can live with.”

“I’m not for term limits…that’s what elections are for,” she goes on. “Maybe some people have been there too long, I get that,” which is why they need to look at the list together she reasons.

Illinois Speaker of the House Mike Madigan
Illinois Speaker of the House Mike Madigan.

In a state where Blacks continually do less that 2 percent of the state’s business and cuts to vital services in the Black community are always on the table, the fact that the Black Caucus is talking about looking at a plan TOGETHER with Rauner should be of grave concern to the people Lightford said have built “legacies” while not letting the Blacks participate equally.

I don’t know whom she was talking about, but they better be concerned…

#mazesaid

 

Our Own Plan | The Chicago Defender

By the time you read this article, Chicago will have elected its next mayor who once again will not be Black, but by all accounts will be elected based on the Black vote. In Chicago’s first-ever may

rahm-black-caucusBy the time you read this article, Chicago will have elected its next mayor who once again will not be Black, but by all accounts will be elected based on the Black vote. In Chicago’s first-ever mayoral runoff between incumbent Rahm Emanuel and challenger Jesus “Chuy” Garcia, both candidates have spent a significant amount of their time campaigning in the city’s Black wards. But with no true Black agenda, it is important that the Black community have its own plan for the next four years, regardless of who is elected mayor.

 

The Black Agenda

Since the gains achieved during the civil rights era, there are very few issues that the Black community has consistently coalesced around, stood for or stood against consistently, which has made it difficult to build unity within the Black community. Taking this into account, the first step is a meeting of representatives from the Black political, business, civic, service and education communities to develop a Black Agenda. The Black Agenda would serve as the measurement tool of Black progress, the measuring stick by which the Black community can judge how worthy both Black and white candidates, businesses, non-profits and schools are of our support. By creating a Black Agenda, with input from all aspects of the Black community, Blacks can create our own uniform standard of accountability.

 

Black Infrastructure

When Harold Washington successfully ran for mayor, it did not happen on a whim, but was a well-orchestrated plan made possible by the existence of a Black infrastructure that no longer exists today. Washington was able to rely on the independent Black politicians for signatures and votes, Black activists for organizing and Black businesses for funding. At the time of Harold Washington’s election, there were 28 businesses in Chicago on the Black Enterprise 100. Today there is only one. Between Daley and Shakman, the Black political organizations have been decimated and the Black activist community has aged out, leaving up-and-coming activists without clear guidance or direction. Regardless of who is mayor, the Black community must rebuild its internal infrastructure of businesses, political organizations, civic and service groups, and educational institutions through consistent communication. By developing the Black agenda and having the Black infrastructure to support it, the Black community can focus on economics.

 

Black Economics

When Black politicians pass laws that help Black businesses, those Black businesses in turn hire Black people. This means that regardless of who is mayor, Black people must be vociferous in the demand for their economic piece of the pie in every aspect of city government, including jobs, contracts and purchasing. City records show that whites are still dominant in the areas of jobs and contracts, so to advance economically in the city, the Black community must redefine its path to success. Oftentimes Black activists waste countless hours protesting worksites and construction companies, knowing that a limited few companies can actually compete for the work. Instead of constantly fighting for the construction jobs, Blacks should consider fighting for the jobs that create jobs by generating contracts and providing purchasing opportunities. Blacks should consider the route of procurement over the numbers working in streets and sanitation.

 

De-Emphasize Social Services

Social services have become an all-consuming liability in the Black community. In many cases, social service agencies are not only service providers, but also major employers in the community. This leaves the Black community in a precarious position because whenever the government needs to make cuts, the first place they cut is social services, which has a two-fold effect on the Black community — cuts in services and cuts in jobs. Going forward, if the Black community is to succeed, we must decrease our dependence on social services as an economic engine and replace it with other entrepreneurial ventures that are less likely to be impacted by government cuts.

 

Regardless of who is the next mayor, the Black community needs our own plan.

Source: Our Own Plan | The Chicago Defender

What’s in It for the Black People?

WHAT’S IN IT FOR BLACK PEOPLE? This question is the litmus test through which we as BLACK people must view every aspect of our collective lives, if we want to thrive in this country. To change the game, we must be dispassionate to the needs of those outside of the BLACK community until they can satisfactorily answer the question, WHAT’S IN IT FOR BLACK PEOPLE?

images-1

So many times, proposals, plans and propositions are presented to us, AFTER the work has been done. They can plan for the building, the parking, and even plan the beautification, but when do THEY plan for the Black people, And when they bring the plan, it’s for the so-called “community.” Well Black people need to separate ourselves from the so-called “community” and start asking specifically, “WHAT’S IN IT FOR BLACK PEOPLE?”

Just imagine, if EVERYBODY, and I mean EVERYBODY that came into OUR community, whether it was to open a business, get a vote, do a project, or open a school had to answer the question, WHAT’S IN IT FOR BLACK PEOPLE, how different THE BLACK COMMUNITY would be?

But who is REALLY willing to ask, WHAT IS IN IT FOR BLACK PEOPLE? The answer should be everybody! So many times when I am at high profile events, BLACK folk are more interested in selfies and appearing intelligent than asking the essential question. When someone like me ask, “WHAT’S IN IT FOR BLACK PEOPLE?” Everyone gets scared and offended.

Well “WHAT’S IN IT FOR BLACK PEOPLE should be the starting point when anyone comes asking Black people for support for anything, and its EVERYBODY’S responsibility to ask.

images-2

 

So the next time you’re at an event, meeting, or gathering and someone is seeking what appears to be the support of the Black community, before you go into a long winded soliloquy, remember to ask, “WHAT’S IN IT FOR BLACK PEOPLE?” If they can’t demonstrate contracts, jobs, investment, and targeted community development, there are no more questions necessary, and everything else they are talking about should fall on our collective deaf ears.

%d bloggers like this: